Securing your Bushtracker

Submitted: Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:18
ThreadID: 119788 Views:2952 Replies:14 FollowUps:0
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I am interested in how other owners secure their Bushtrackers when they leave it unattended and go off in the vehicle. I have put a picture in an album called Bushtracker Bits which shows the coupling on the Bushtracker. Does anyone know of a lockable pin which disables this coupling? Or are there alternative security devices to consider?
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:20

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:20
The problem with disabling the coupling somehow does not prevent a thief from simply towing it away with only the chains, either yours or his. Many boat trailers have dissapeared this way. The only way is to disable the wheels somehow. I have seen a locked chain thru the wheels but chains are easily cut. 60 secs with a hack saw or bolt cutters would do the trick. I have made a device which bolts onto the wheel studs which will give some sort of visible deterent. There are some other types of wheel locable devices around but locks can be broken very easily. I am sure there is no foolproof method except to have a guard on duty at all times. Just a fact of life these days. Maybe try putting up a placard which says "HAZCHEM....Anthrax on Board" Nomad
AnswerID: 558141

Reply By: Turist - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:21

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:21
Doesn't matter what you do, if they want it they will get it.
Neighbour had a trailer boat stolen from outside bedroom window, down
steep drive about 50 metres from road. Had a 'Helmet Hitch' fitted. The
thieves left the helmet hitch in the street at top of drive. We think
they winched boat up hill.
Even wheel clamps easily defeated. Honda geny plus 4' angle grinder plus
3 mins.
I am just relying on the fact that (so far) Bushtrackers are unique and
easily identified.
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AnswerID: 558142

Reply By: Turist - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:22

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:22
More of a concern to us the petty theft of items around the van.
We had several lengths of stainless steel cable made with a thimble swaged at each end.
One thimble should be larger than the other so that you can pull an end through like a noose.
Whenever we leave the van we pass the cable through tables chairs etc and padlock to van.
When running genny away from van we secure to tree by same method.
Will not stop a determined well prepard thief but stops opportunistic thieving which seem to be the biggest problem.
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:23

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:23
Hi, I agree with you. If they want it they'll get it. All we can do is to make it tough for them. There are many and varied security devices. Probably the most secure in cases where you live in a high risk area is a post that is bolted into the ground, close to the house. Most of these trailer locks and security devices are made to slow thieves up, prevent impulse theft and eliminate easy targets. Trailer Locks for the AT35? See the photo in teh Couplematre section. We're currently working on it. Rgs Steve
AnswerID: 558144

Reply By: Noosa Fox - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:24

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:24
We use a stainless steel cable to go through the gas bottles and spare wheels with a pad lock on to slow them down a bit. At least they would have to have bolt cutters to cut the lock. My daughter told me today that her friends caravan in Victoria was recently stolen from their property so I think I will put one of those lockable bolts for securing towbar to vehicle through the van coupling and have that locked. It would be hard to tow a 3000kg Bushtracker away using just safety chains, they wouldn't get too far.
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:25

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:25
Your right, if they want it bad enough. Ive heard of people going to great lengths to secure their traliers, caravans, boats ect. and end up having it loaded on a tilt tray never to be seen again! But slowing them down and making it as hard as possible is a good start. Dad made up some simple wheel locks that bolt onto the stud and secure with a pad lock, van will only move a metre or so before it starts to do damage, just remember to take them off! Also the spares are right there so be sure to lock them up somehow, but not with those mag wheel stud lock things, every two-bit theif in the countrys got a set of them!
AnswerID: 558146

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:26

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:26
Further to some previous email the Couplemate OffRoad is now on show at the Gold Coast 4WD and fishing show. It will also be at the Sydney 4WD Show at the Permatrim Stand. The Couplemate OffRoad fits the AT35 but not the latest version AT35. Vehicle Components are currently re-engineering the Offroader to fit their new version. Other news, there many be available soon a stainless pin for the AT35. The grapevine says a group from Sydney may be working VC for a locking mechanism that fits under the AT35 pin. I'll keep you posted. Cheers Steve
AnswerID: 558147

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:27

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:27
Has anyone considered the GPS-based services that transmit the location of the van. Used a lot now with high-value goods in interstate trucks, the up-market cars etc. I don't know much about them but would be happy to research if if there's any general interest.
Collyn
AnswerID: 558148

Reply By: Noosa Fox - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:28

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:28
Collyn, I think the GPS security device is only any good to track the vehicle, after it has already been stolen. They don't prevent the theft. In the case of a car they may have additional immobiliser but they won't work too good on a caravan. I have seen the some people have wheel clamps on their vans, but they are bulky and take up extra weight. A looking pin through the coupling would probably suffice for 99% of cases.
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:29

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:29
Brian

Yes indeed - it only tracks the van - but the companies offering these services monitor the network 24 hours a day - and liase directly with the police. The probability of recovery within a few hours is very high indeed.

I would not bother to go this far with a holiday van - but might if it was my semi-permanent home.
Collyn
AnswerID: 558150

Reply By: Wadefarers - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:30

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:30
All One thing I found useful was the lock they use for motorcycles - the blue molybdenum (I think) U bolt shaped lock with the funny key. It will fit through the AT35 hole and lock it (as best you can) You can also use it to hook the chains into it as a prevention tool. One is also good for the gas cylinders as it locks the middle turn screw holding the cylinders in by locking it to the bracket. Just make sure you don't lose the keys!! Jeff
AnswerID: 558151

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:31

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:31
All, I have the NRMA CarCom security system installed in my car -this uses satellite GPS tracking. It is certainly feasible to install in a caravan, tho' I have not done that. The system does much more than just allow tracking of the vehicle after a theft has occurred. Here are a few comments: 1) With sensors installed (normally connected to door and bonnet areas, but feasible to install to main c'van door, voltage drop allows any intrusion to be detected which sends an intrusion alarm to base. The base operator can then communicate verbally with the vehicle and challenge any person (a password is required to prevent despatch of police). My car was once broken into (had about $1,500 of camping equipment in the back), and the base scared off the intruder even before I knew an intrusion had occurred. 2) There is also a "panic button" so that in case of emergency, an intruder or a serious case of road rage, use this to activate an alarm as above. 3) Future plans will also include a "help" button which will provide operator assistance with things like travel bookings, directory assistance and so on - that service is still about 12 months away. 4) The alarm provides 24-hour monitoring of battery condition, and the operator will advise you if a poor battery state is detected The main thing to be aware of is that whilst satellite is used to track the location of the vehicle, the actual alarm signal is sent using the digital mobile network. So if you are in a remote location, alarm despatch will not operate. If a vehicle were reported stolen in an out-of-range area though, the satellite service will still provide tracking to assist quick recovery. (This tracking is accurate to about 2 metres - CarCom can usually tell if I am parked in my driveway or my garage!) It is some time since I had this installed, cost I think is about $1,800 - the system can be uninstalled/re-installed if you buy a new vehicle for about $300. Monitoring costs about $300 per year from memory. I would definitely have it installed in my vehicle, if only for the ability to call emergency services (st to mobile access) - in terms of van security, I agree that a coupling pin lock is a reasonable solution (but anyone can just remove the holding bolts on the coupling and replace it with another coupling for towing!). If you want an electronic alarm system, then in my view a Satellite system is probably the best proposition, especially if the van is left for long periods at campsites or in storage. Phil
AnswerID: 558152

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:32

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:32
Goodish review of some security gear in Caravan & Motorhome #44 (Feb2003) Lock & Load Griff
AnswerID: 558153

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:33

Monday, Feb 24, 2003 at 00:33
Yes I would be interested in obtaining information on GPS-based services that transmit the location of the van. Dennis
AnswerID: 558154

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