Changing Tyres

Submitted: Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:00
ThreadID: 119940 Views:2552 Replies:9 FollowUps:0
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I'm interested in what other Boggers might use to lift the side of the BT when it's necessary to change tyres. At the moment I'm carrying a hydraulic jack, but am a little concerned about versatility and lift hight in varying conditions. Had a look at a product distributed by Hardings called a Sidewind. Brackets welded near each wheel and a geared lifter which slots in the bracket. Great theory but lifting capacity limited to 1,100 kg. What are others doing? Thanks in advance.
Motley

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Reply By: Deleted User - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:02

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:02
G'day Pete,

I'm like you I use a hyd bottle jack and lift the A- Arm not the van for obvious reasons. The gap from the jack point to ground is approx 300mm and as the F250 jack goes from 200- 350 I use that. At home here I use a scissor jack going from about 80-300 with a block of wood. Because of the load sharing you can jack one wheel up quite easy and the van is safe from collapse if you only remove one wheel at a time. At a pinch and only a real emergency I think you could limp along on three wheels if you seized a bearing etc. Anyone had to do that ?

Be nice to have V8 Supercar hydraulics to change wheels and level van on site. <wink>

Anthony
AnswerID: 558891

Reply By: Wadefarers - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:03

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:03
Peter I have a 2.25 tonne trolley jack at home and have been thinking of taking that on long trips. Bit of a weight to carry but thought of putting on floor in second row of seats. Maybe a bit over the top, but could make life easier. Just on Anthony's comment - do either of you carry spare wheel bearings - probably a stupid question because I suppose you should. Jeff
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Reply By: Cracker - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:04

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:04
Any reason why people aren't using exhaust jacks regards cracker
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Reply By: Turist - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:05

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:05
Exhaust jacks are great, trouble is, despite a thousand promises from the supplier we can not get an adaptor to suit F250.
Turist
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Reply By: Deleted User - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:06

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:06
G'day Jeff,
To be honest I dont carry any spares but I only cruise around within 2-3hrs of Bris. Will have a set on board before Cania. I'm about to strip all my hubs off and clean, regrease and adjust. I will do a write up on this explaining it step by step so people can print it out and store in BT. I hope to write it so anyone with no mech knowledge will be able to do it if stuck on the side of road.

In the post above I meant if the bearing seized and the inner bearing cup spun on the stub axle surface and destroyed it or welded itself to the surface. You would need to limp somewhere grind off axle and weld on new one..... really up the Jardine without a paddle !

A few things kill bearings .... a hot hub in a cold river causing the seal to bypass water, too much grease in hub stopping heat transfer out of bearing, a worn seal allowing dirt in etc.
Overtightening or undertightening if "excessive" either way with overtightening being the lesser evil. (slight preload) I've seen a few people place new bearing out of the packet onto the concrete floor picking up again with grit/shop floor crap attached and using !!

Anthony



AnswerID: 558895

Reply By: Wadefarers - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:07

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:07
Anthony What can I say - completely on the ball - AS USUAL!!!!!! Thanks Jeff
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Reply By: Deleted User - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:08

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:08
Hi Mates. I'm about to do something bad, I'm sure, but here goes. Has anyone specified a Hydraulic Disc braking system. I'm looking closesly at the Bainbridge Titan set-up which, among other things, can include a modestly priced option of a hub oiler. Technically it all makes a hell of a lot of sense to me as I would never think of getting myself a drum-brake equiped car (not since a particularly interesting encounter with white knuckles on an Austin A40), so why settle for pully up the bush beast down Bulli Pass with drums? Some negatives have been around parking brakes as well as moisture absorbing hydraulic oil & dry seals if van left idle for too long (is a month too long? A year?). Anyway, here's my head. There's the cream pie. Do your worst. Griff the Heretic
AnswerID: 558897

Reply By: Deleted User - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:09

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:09
I carry a 4 ton exhaust bag and a 4 ton bottle jack, a combination for every ocassion. The bottle jack is positioned between the 2 wheels and lits them off the ground comfortably. The bag can be placed anywhere under the BT.
AnswerID: 558898

Reply By: Deleted User - Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:10

Tuesday, May 20, 2003 at 00:10
Along with bags & long jacks (if we ever go really feral), I'm also looking at a Maytow Multi-Weigh combination hydraulic bottle-jack with weight guage as alternative to carrying jack & Motley's ADK ball-weight measure. Seems you can use to calculate Ball Weight & GVM. Anyone seen one? Levitation Rules Griff
AnswerID: 558899

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