Cool Light

Submitted: Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:40
ThreadID: 120009 Views:2092 Replies:3 FollowUps:0
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Any investigation to the pros & cons of LED lighting for interior (spot &/or general) and exterior running lights & tail light assemblies. I know they are filtering into the marine, boat trailer & truck industries, but haven't seen a mention (outside torches) for the RV/Camping fraternities. Too costly? Griff
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:42

Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:42
G'day Griff, I grabbed a Hella brochure which featured these lights and their bulb ones as well. The DuraLED lights say above them .... DuraLed ... warning signal lamps for emergency services. Amber, Red, Blue DuraLed ... warning signal lamps for specialty applications. White, Green A strange thing on every bulb light but NOT on the LED's was a small sign saying ... ADR Compliance. This would indicate no ADR approval for these lights. I have seen these lights already on trailers in Bris and they are very bright. I think they can be fitted to trailers/vans because they are not subject to ADR's. These are really great lights especially if they can be fitted to vans. Blurb says ... Multivolt high intensity, signal optic LED lamps. Voltage 9 -33 V Come prewired with 2.5 m of cable. No mention of current draw or waterproof rating. I believe they are submersible ? www.hella.com.au Anthony
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:43

Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:43
Hi Anthony. Re ADR, have a look at:- www.boatshop.com.au then go to Online catalogue, then Lights & Bulbs. I'm absolutely sure I saw some even larger ones on a Tri-Tri B-double I was trailing the other day. Must be out there. Red & Amber ones quote between 50-100,000 hours globe life, with white from 10,000- 50,000. Single bulbs (in total dark) are supposed to be able to be seen from 1 to 3 kilometers away, so I was thinking with such infinitesimal current draw, setting a red pair to run off van batteries to blink on the back of the van at night on raod-side stops may be handy. If not, just put one of the bycicle flashing units in the back window would be an easy fix. - - Griff
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Reply By: Noosa Fox - Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:44

Monday, Jul 07, 2003 at 06:44
Griff, I don't really think you need a park light on rear of van for roadside stops. You can always find somewhere to get off the road, in a rest stop or in vacant land behind rest stop to get even further off the road. I like to get well off the road. The picture of the 2 vans in the "Whats New" section was taking in a gravel pit and that high wall of gravel in the back ground is between us and the road, so no-one had any idea that 2 vans were camped there as they drove past. There arn't many Yobbos out there, but when you are camped near a road by yourself it doesn't pay to advertise the fact by having a flashing light going. You have to be a little careful as to how bright the red lights are that are fitted to the rear of vehicles and trailers. The bright red tail light and low down white fog lights on many newer cars, can only legally be used when driving in FOG and you can receive an on the spot fine for having them operating when it is not foggy. Personally I wish more police would take action against drivers that drive with headlights and fog lights on blinding oncoming traffic. Bright white one that draw little current would be great for use on the annex side of the van, as the ones fitted by BT don't give a really good light. We use a portable fluro light. Brian
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