BT nuts

Submitted: Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:44
ThreadID: 120312 Views:2487 Replies:6 FollowUps:0
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Hi fellow boggers, While I was staying at Camden Poplar Caravan Park, a fellow caravanner (didn't have a BT but spent a considerable amount of time admiring mine!) advised to get the nuts on the BT replaced with lock nuts (those ones that cover the bolts completely) to prevent rusting of both nuts and wheel bolts and thus risking "rust welding". What do boggers have to say on this? Does BTi apply rust preventative measures to prevent this happening? Cheers, Michael.
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Reply By: Deleted User - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:46

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:46
G'day Michael, This is a bit of a rock and a hard place with anything preventing rust usually attracting dust /dirt. I would rather have dirt than rust though as its obviously easier to get off. I would suggest to anyone that has even the slightest corrosion on the exposed threads to thoroughly remove it before undoing the nuts ...to prevent galling /seizing of the nut onto the thread. The best way is to use a small wire brush available from most places like Trade Tools or similar in whatever state you live in .... the stainless ones are especially good as they dont corrode in the tool box. These brushes are 6-8 inches long and the bristle area is about 3 " x 1/2". I'll place a pic in my album. Give the threads a good clean with one of these before removing wheel and all should be well. I've gone down the road of "prevention" by using a specialist product from the marine industry. This stuff works on metal submerged in salt water. On my boat trailer I ground a bare patch on the axle and smeared this grease over the area. It stayed rust free for 5 years. The product is called Lanocote and is an Anti-Corrosion Compound containing Anhydrous lanolin. Bob's experience in the boating area might have a name for others ? When the BT first arrived home I wire brushed the threads and placed a good coating of this grease on the threads and nut face (not tapered end that contacts wheel, the exposed thread end). Dirt road travel soon has the grease covered in dust. I grab a rag and wipe most off, then while holding a rag under each nut spray it RP7 or similar to remove it all and clean nuts for removal. After replacement I just replace coating of Lanocote .... done !!! It is a bit of a hassle but the amount of times you have to remove wheels its ok for me ! One beer per side and the job is done !!! [smile] In my opinion this is better than removing rust each time to remove nuts as its not good to have the exposed threads continually rusting. Be careful with getting grease on the thread that the nut uses and never on the nut tapered section as any friction reduction here will give a false torque setting or potential to overtighten. With some anti-corrosion compounds they require 40 % less torque to achieve the same compression between the wheel and brake drum faces. Anthony Explore this Great Land ... Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 560697

Reply By: Deleted User - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:47

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:47
I forgot to say if you can get nuts to cover thats a great soln also ...might be a bit on the expensive side with 20 to purchase. If going this way only use motor or machine oil to lube threads before nuts go on .... not anti-corrosion. Still nothing on the taper area. Here is a pic of brush ....
AnswerID: 560698

Reply By: Turist - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:48

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:48
Covers only cover. They do not protect.
Rust lock will only happen to those that do not have a preventive maintenance schedule, ie, checking brake linings, wheel bearings etc once a year.
A little dab of lanoline grease or a squirt of Inox or similar when replacing nuts and no problems.
Do not use WD40, becomes hydroscopic when dry.

regards
Turist
"Do It While You Can"
Nobody is getting any younger.

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AnswerID: 560699

Reply By: Deleted User - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:49

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:49
Anthony, what about a spray of Inox was told to do
this by Nilrust technician. As I understand it penetrates and coats and
importantly dries?
Regards Macka
AnswerID: 560700

Reply By: Deleted User - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:50

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:50
Sorry Turist,
Read your post after replying to
Anthony
Macka
AnswerID: 560701

Reply By: Bushtracker42 - Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:51

Friday, Jan 02, 2004 at 22:51
Don’t
forget the spares bolts



----------------------

Gary Harding

TriSys Engineering/III



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From: Bushtracker18
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Sent: Friday, 2 January 2004 1:25
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From: Bushtracker18






I forgot to say if you can get nuts to cover thats
a great soln also ...might be a bit on the expensive side with 20 to
purchase. If going this way only use motor or machine oil to lube threads
before nuts go on .... not anti-corrosion. Still nothing on the taper area.





Here is a pic of brush ....





















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