Shu Roo

Submitted: Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:32
ThreadID: 120628 Views:3263 Replies:11 FollowUps:0
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Anyone interested in the "capabilities" of this device to shoo away roos from the front of the vehicle should first read the following thorough report from the University of New South Wales. It contians more detail than you will want, but may save you some $$$.

www.bees.unsw.edu.au/staff/research/ ramp/Shu%20Roo%20Final%20Report.pd

Doug.
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Reply By: TripnTaps - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:34

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:34
Hi Doug, Tried to connect to this address twice but page unavailable. Very interested in this product so would like to source information - can you post article on this thread. The main page and search engine did not have a link that I could find to this research. Thanks, Helen
AnswerID: 562492

Reply By: gottabjoaken - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:35

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:35
slight error on the URL www.bees.unsw.edu.au/staff/research/ramp/Shu%20Roo%20Final%20Report.pdf should work for you. Ken
AnswerID: 562493

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:36

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:36
Helen,
I couldn't get it either. If you delete everything after the word "ramp" it will take you to a page with a list of items. You'll see the Shu Roo final report there. It's a pdf file, so you'll need to download it.

Basically, it says that extensive testing revealed that it simply doesn't work. The tests covered scientific measurement plus a survey of vehicles with and without the product. There are pages and pages of information on the tests and how they were conducted, but the conclusion is as I have summarised above. Like all such monster reports, it has a lengthy preface which includes, under the heading "Causes of animal/vehicle accidents", the following gem:

"Collisions between animals and vehicles are caused when both occur in the same place at the same time."

Ah, academics, ya gotta love their work! (wink)

Michael
AnswerID: 562494

Reply By: TripnTaps - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:37

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:37
Thanks Michael & Ken, Priceless quote that Michael...ahhh academics and politicians... don't you just luv em.. somehow it always comes down to the obvious!!! I inquired some time last year on this site about any boggers experience with Shu Roos and did get one reply from one of our members (name escapes me) who had positive feed back on his fitted Shu Roos. Had picked up a brochure a couple of weeks ago at Out of Town 4WD Barnsley NSW and the blurb claimed a major transport co was using them and had encountered less impacts with kangaroos as a result. Would be nice if it did work Cheers. Helen
AnswerID: 562495

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:38

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:38
This is in no way a scientific report: Our previous vehicle was a Subaru Outback. Could not find a decent protection bar for the vehicle. Had two impacts with roos, (we do 95% country driving), so fitted a Shoo Roo and I believe it definately made a difference. The sound seems to alert the roos at a greater distance, encouraging them to move and therefore become obvious, allowing more time for braking. Any way, never hit a roo with the Shoo Roo over 135,000km. Sure got some funny looks in town though, if you leave it turned on. Went to a bullbar for our current vehicle and have not looked like thumping a roo in 101,000km! Funny, that! Cheers, Kate.
AnswerID: 562496

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:39

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:39
Wow !! "Collisions between animals and vehicles are caused when both occur in the same place at the same time." The academics probably spent a couple of years doing this study, possibly with government funding (our taxes) with each on a six figure salary ! The scary thing is that these people could finish up as polititions ! On the conclusion, obviously, the way to avoid a collision between an animal and a vehicle is to NOT be in the same place at the same time. Avoid travelling at night (eliminates the need for driving lights too) and at dawn and dusk. Make camp at least an hour before sunset, light the campfire, pull out a stubby or glass of wine, and relax. Maybe you'll see a roo hop by towards the road. SEE ATTACHED PHOTO cheers.......................Rob
AnswerID: 562497

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:40

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:40
Kate,

Despite the quoted gem, which was little more than a statement of the obvious, the full report seems to be extremely scientific and very thorough.
Maybe after all those kilometres your vehicle is just getting a bit noisier and that is what frightens Skippy away? (wink)

Michael
AnswerID: 562498

Reply By: Bushtracker Buck & Babe - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:41

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:41
Thanks Rob, that photo is on the desktop now. Best way to avoid the roos I agree. Angie
AnswerID: 562499

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:42

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:42
Michael, I was referring to MY comments not being scientific! I'm sure the UNSW study was carried out to the letter. cheers, Kate.
AnswerID: 562500

Reply By: TripnTaps - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:43

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:43
Rob, Looks good and we usually do that too ...camp & at sunset... nothing better.... but we have had experience of a large roo collecting our left rear wheel in our old Range Rover at 2 in the afternoon (didn't think it was that quiet).... did an amazing lot of damage to the aluminium panelling and history for the roo - and in SA a couple of emus decided to play cat & mouse between the RR and our CampOMatic at 9.30 in the morning.... at 100km hr... we missed one... flipped the other... they are so fast! Hence my interest in Shu Roos On your recent trip did your grandchild arrive safely and considerately after you got home.... I recall the babe was scheduled in there somewhere Cheers Helen
AnswerID: 562501

Reply By: Deleted User - Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:44

Wednesday, Jun 23, 2004 at 00:44
Helen, yes we have encounted wildlife during the day, and the better visibility gives more time to react. Haven't heard any info on the effect of shu roos during daylight hours. Was that covered in the study ? And yes, little Seth Beckington arrived 2 weeks early, by caesarian (put his foot through the water), 6lb 2oz and all are well. We were coming out of Ka Ka Mundi and stopped on top of a hill for photo when the message came through....."It's a boy, it's a boy ! Come home quick!" We by-passed Salvator Rosa and Goodliff Sections and took 3 1/2 days to get home - without driving at night! Cheers...........Rob & Liz
AnswerID: 562502

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