New Batteries Install and Busbar nearly there !

Submitted: Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:34
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G'day all, A couple of pics, of new batts and bus/distribution board that is nearly done. All that is left is the tie-down clamps and to fabricate the polycarbonate cover for over the batteries. The bus was made by me and is fabricated from 20mm nylon sheet. The copper bus bars are fabricated from 6mm x 25mm round edge, flat bar. They are spaced by 35mm nylon round bar. The cover (to keep things away from terminals,shorting etc) is made from 3mm polycarbonate sheet and held onto the studs with 35mm round nylon bar via tapped holes the same as the stud. A 60amp circuit breaker is fitted to protect the bus ... the original 40amp breakers fitted at build time are still fitted downstream of the bus. The battery cables were cut from 35 sq mm double sheathed cable and crimped by my crimper ... double wall, epoxy heat shrink was then placed over cable terminal junction and heated to seal. Batteries are 3 x 108 amp hr Absorbed Power AGM's. All that is left to do is the clamps to hold batteries down securely and to fabricate the poly cover that will go over battery terminals to stop potential (highly improbable but not impossible) shorts. For now the whole area is vented via original BT vent. The area specifically around the batteries will be eventually sealed then vented separately ... Regards Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:36

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:36
Anthony old son, I hate to tell you this but never use nylon as it asbsorbs moisture from the atmosphere to the tune of 3% by volume so it WILL lose its electrical insulation properties, also it is useless as a bearing material for the same reason it swells with the water and locks up on the shaft. Greg
AnswerID: 562694

Reply By: Bushtracker Buck & Babe - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:37

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:37
Anthony, don't understand the technobabble, but love the pretty shiny bits. Angie 9 sleeps to go (and don't let Ivan tell you its 10)
AnswerID: 562695

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:38

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:38
Greg, Thanks for the warning. When I purchased it I was told it was nylon but upon machining/cutting it ... it seemed like polyethylene to me. I'll have to contact the supplier to get to the bottom of what it is .... as you know there is hundreds of types. I cant see it being a problem at 3% moisture and the very small voltage used (12) ? Look at cars driving in the rain with 12v ? Are you looking at it from an electrolysis problem to the steel wheel arch ? I used anti-electrolysis compound on the bolts to attach it to the wheel arch. Some nylons exhibit very low moisture absorption with excellent electrical insulation properties as well ....(Nylon 11) Better safe than sorry I might cut a sheet of rubber and place it under the sheet if it is nylon. Thanks .. Regards Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 562696

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:39

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:39
Anthony according to my memory, as it's a loooong time since I worked with plastics, I'll check it tomorrow even type11 will absorb 3% moisture. I am not suggesting that you will get a monstous short but rather one of those isidious litte drains that accumulate to send the batteries flat. Its very hard to tell from a photo but it looks as if it may be HMW or UHMW Polyethylene which wood be very safe as long as the temp doesn't get over about 95C, geez I'm testing the memory now, which in your application shouldn't be a problem. I would see about getting some Polyacetal (Delrin) or even densified wood bolts and that will alleviate any possibilities of electrolisys. Greg
AnswerID: 562697

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:40

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:40
Greg, Upon calling the supplier this morning he states it is Hi-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) which is a High Molecular Weight (HMW) product ...I believe ? Problem solved as poly is virtually water proof according to the supplier. There was never really a problem anyway with 12v dc. As for stray current/electrolysis I used my standard fixing from my boat days ... bolt is in the plastic sheet (insulated from steel wheel well) ... bolt has heat shrink on shaft as it passes through steel sheet of wheel well to insulate there .... under nut is a stainless washer ..then a plastic washer which is against underside of steel sheet of wheel arch... no electrical contact. This worked really well in the boat when fixing stainless fixtures to aluminium in the boat with stainless steel fasteners. Boat ran around Moreton Bay for 5 yrs with very minimal electrolytic corrosion between dissimilar metals. Thanks for the food for thought ...learn sumthin new every day !! Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 562698

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:41

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:41
Battery hold down clamps are now in place. I have fabricated a polycarbonate shield that covers the positive terminals (just in case) ...this is held on by the secondary nuts on the battery clamp tie downs. All done ! On to the next project .... Regards Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 562699

Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:42

Monday, Jul 19, 2004 at 20:42
Anthony, Looks nice anyway macka
AnswerID: 562700

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