gas bottles?

Submitted: Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:17
ThreadID: 120690 Views:3285 Replies:5 FollowUps:0
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Hi all I know there was a discussion on this at some stage previously but I can't find it. Can someone please reiterate whether it is possible/safe/simple to link bbq to BT gas bottles or not. If it can be done, how? If no go, why? Prue PS Have seen our first BT in Darwin and stopped to chat. Not members of the group because they have belonged to other groups and found the expectations too much to handle. Explained the difference with this group and they were interested. Their BT is 5 years old and rarely sees bitumen roads.
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:19

Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:19
G'day Prue, LPG bottle hoses/regulators that can be purchased from camping stores etc are the only hoses that can be used to connect a cylinder to an appliance. You will have probably noticed that they are not that long (I think 1.2 metres max) this is because they must comply with the legislation applicable to them in both length,type and method of fitting attachment. It is also illegal for a licensed gas fitter to make a hose longer than the max allowable by swagging two ends onto a longer hose. It is also illegal to join two hoses by a fitting or using hose clamps etc This is done for good reason ..by nature of the hose being longer ...if someone trips and pulls the cylinder on its side and liquid lpg not vapour travels to the lit burner ...watch out !! Pretty hard to buck the system here ...Aust Standards and the Gas Act. What might be possible though ..... and should be perfectly legal (check with a licensed gas fitter) .... You might be able to run a solid copper line the same as we have that runs from our bottles to the stove/water heater. Or easier still you might be able to break into this line with a "t" fitting and run a copper line to the edge of the BT where you want to place the stove/bbq ? This would need some form of "dry brake" click in- click out gas fitting ? A ballvalve to cut supply would have to be in line as well ..just like one for BT stove now ? It would need a good dust cover for travel. It would also be wise to protect it from stone damage. That way you could leave the cylinders where they are ...no changing of cylinders etc ...just pull up place stove/bbq on stand ...click in regulator/hose and cook away ! Run it past a licensed gas fitter to see if it is legal ? Check local yellow pages of particular area you are in for a fitter. Wouldnt it be nice to open a little dustproof door in the chequerplate and click in a lpg hose for the outside stove !! Regards Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 562810

Reply By: Jaunty Jordans - Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:20

Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:20
Anthony Thank you for your quick and informative response. I knew it would be either you or Jay who would know the answer and keep it simple for me. luv Prue
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Reply By: Motley - Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:21

Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:21
I investigated this in some detail about 12 months ago, I suspect for the same reason - it's one less gas bottle to stow and carry. The BIG problem is most gas BBQs (at least all the one's I know of) use high pressure gas. That is, you connect a hose directly from the bottle to the BBQ - no regulator. Therefore to utilise the bottles on the Bushtracker, you have to tap off the bottle before the regulator. And then you've got the problem of a high pressure gas line which, to all intents and purposes is full of gas when the BT bottles are turned on for water heating etc. I couldn't find a satisfactory solution that met my needs in terms of safety. Anything I did would have had to rely on a "cobbled" solution. And Anthony is right. You are only supposed to use the fittings you can legally purchase to connect to a gas bottle. In the end, I figured the risks weren't worth it and I carry a 4.5kg bottle in the stowage hold
Motley

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Reply By: Motley - Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:22

Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:22
Anthony, Problem with those snap in gas fittings is that they are only rated for low pressure LPG, not high pressure Pete
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:23

Monday, Aug 02, 2004 at 11:23
Pete, Woops ! I assumed everyone has low pressure appliances like the stove and hot water system in our BT's. For those with the low pressure stuff it might still be a viable option ?? To tell the truth I do the same as you ...I carry an extra bottle in the back of the truck for the outside stove. This comes into its own when I take the stove in the vehicle to cook lunch away from BT. Anthony Explore this Great Land ...Do it Easy ...Tow a Bushtracker
AnswerID: 562814

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