Pneumatic jockey wheel tyres

Submitted: Friday, Aug 04, 2006 at 22:08
ThreadID: 122830 Views:3885 Replies:4 FollowUps:4
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For some time there have been people filling the pneumatic jockey wheel tyres with a substance that makes them solid.
Roger Bunny suggested filling them with water, so the 2 of us have just filled our tyres with water then put a bit of air pressure in and they appear to be much better than just having air.
I will test ours for the next few weeks and people at the rally can have a look and see what they think about the idea.
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Reply By: FTP TRACKERS - Friday, Aug 04, 2006 at 22:38

Friday, Aug 04, 2006 at 22:38
Gooday Brian,
I had the tire on our jockey wheel filled with silicone soon after we bought the van. The cheap chinese made tyres and tubes just can't handle the weight of a big B/T. I had mine done at the Darra tyre works in Brisbane, cost $27 and should last forever.

Regards Ian.
AnswerID: 568999

Follow Up By: Bushtracker - Friday, Aug 04, 2006 at 23:09

Friday, Aug 04, 2006 at 23:09
Hello Ian,
We have had a better set of tubes for those jockey wheels for the past several years. However, our new solid tyre jockey wheel, with single lever direction, and socket wrench style handle, is altogether a better system...

Owners Forum TIP # 82 about six months ago, introducing our new Jockey Wheel, solid tyre, 750 kg download... Greased, it seems a much tougher system.

When your is damaged or retires, we will be happy to show you the better model that has finally been refined enough to pass our tests.. I just replaced my own and will put the old one on a utility trailer.

Regards, Ranger
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Reply By: Flipp'n Lorry - Saturday, Aug 05, 2006 at 06:31

Saturday, Aug 05, 2006 at 06:31
On our first BT we originally had the ALKO jockey wheel and air-filled tyre (a waste of time really, pretty hopeless), then had a Maco fitted with silicon-filled tyre (a big improvement). On our 2nd BT, we have the new jockey wheel with solid tyre which Steve refers - it's a vast improvement, very reliable.
AnswerID: 569000

Reply By: Boystoy - Friday, Aug 11, 2006 at 09:34

Friday, Aug 11, 2006 at 09:34
There is also a better alternative. We started off with a Maco Mule dual wheel assembly.

We have topped up the tyre pressure just once in two & a half years.

Buy good Aussie made in the first place.

However I rarely use the Maco any more. I opted for a jockey stand which is much quicker to use. I have learned to couple up the AT30 on the BT by myself without the need to move the van, just using the mirrors. This can come with some practice, its simple & quick. It also saves arguments with SWMBO.

Neil
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Follow Up By: TroopyTracker - Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:17

Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:17
Neil,
Can I ask what make of, and where abouts you purchased your jockey stand?? Looking to do same myself. Rarely use the power mover and when I do I HATE it. Would like a stand that can wind up high enough to leave in teh up right position, no need to swivel around or take off.

Thanks,
Matt
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FollowupID: 846108

Reply By: Noosa Fox - Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 08:04

Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 08:04
After a few weeks of using the water filled jockey wheel botyh Roger and I have found it to be very sucessful.

To fill it we got as much air out as possible, then using a piece of fuel hose shoved inside some garden hose, put it over the valve stem, (without a valve in it) and filled it under pressure until it was starting to bulge. The fuel hose was removed and the valve inserted as quick as possible so as not to loose much water. We then put a bit of air pressure in when valve was back in place.

The tyre no longer goes down and the annoying bounce from an air filled tyre is also gone. Only wish that I had done it years ago.

Only down side is the extra weight of the tyre with the water in it.
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Follow Up By: Freewheelers - Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:30

Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:30
did you put any rust inhibitor in the water ???
Stephen & Deborah

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Follow Up By: Bushtracker - Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:42

Friday, Aug 25, 2006 at 20:42
Hello Freewheelers,

You might be thinking of tubeless tyres where the water would set against the steel wheel... These are the old fashioned tubes, like a doughnut of rubber... In anycase, the water might rot the tube eventually anyway, even without adding something like an acid based rust inhibitor like phosphoric acid that is the base for most of them...

I doubt most of the tubes will hold up long with water in them anyway... For those that can afford it, per my previous Post above: The new solid rubber jockey wheel is a superior mechanical action and heavier download capacity, and the problem is solved very well the best way. I have retired my old tube type one to a rubbish trailer, in favour of the new style jockey wheel that has been developed. Problem solved.
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