LPG GAS BOTTLE RATING AND TESTING

Submitted: Saturday, Sep 24, 2011 at 16:48
ThreadID: 127637 Views:2150 Replies:6 FollowUps:3
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Recently had 2x10yo BT gas bottles tested. One failed because it had rub marks from the grey water drain hose which I carrried over the protection shield at the top.

There is a requirement where any scratch or any sign of wear on the bottle will condemn it to scrap.

The tester also made comment that the rating of caravan bottles is 1 or 2 however my two BT OEM bottles were rating 3.

Been triyng to find info in this but no success so far.

As I understand it the rating is a protection coating rating and not a strength rating.
Never discard a galvanised bottle as they don't make them anymore..........

Swap and go bottles are not suitable for mobile use and also they are 8.5kg whereas the BT mounts are for 9kg bottles so are a loose fit.
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Reply By: Boystoy - Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 00:45

Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 00:45
Hi Ern,

I bit the bullet years ago & went with Swap & Go for convenience, as I was having difficulty at the time (in Orange NSW) finding a refill facility.
I used three small pieces of 6mm rubber off the stone flaps on the back of the truck, & taped these on to the gas bottle frame with duct tape. This allows the clamps to work. Have had this arrangement on for about 4 years now, but occasionally we find an old 9kg Swap & Go bottle, & we simply cut the duct tape & remove the rubber bits
Works for us & we don't have to worry about our gas bottles being out of date.

Neil
A Bushtracker (or BT) is a "Boys Toy"

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AnswerID: 583163

Reply By: galacticbob - Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 06:13

Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 06:13
Ern

In regard to the numbers on the bottles it's my understanding 1 or 2 are suitable for caravans. Any ratings above that could under certain circumstances affect an insurance claim.
Like you I have been unable to find any definitive information

Bob

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Reply By: Motherhen & Rooster - Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 10:18

Sunday, Sep 25, 2011 at 10:18
Hi Ern

"In Australian Standard AS 2469 - 2005, the categories which are stamped (numbers 1 to 4) in a circle on the top of the cowall surrounding the valve assembly on gas bottles are as follows:

1 Hot Dip Galvanizing

2 Abrasive blasted + inorganic zinc rich coating + organic zinc rich coating.

3 Sprayed Zinc Coating

4 Red oxide or polyester powder coat.

The numbers refer to the rust proofing treatment of the steel, not the thickness of the steel. Obviously, the thickness of the treatment will vary eg hot dip galvanising is thicker than powder coating.

The Australian Standard requires all gas bottles manufactured in carbon steel to have a wall thickness of 1.75 mm and be tested to a minimum pressure of 320 Mpa.

The only exception is gas bottles manufactured in stainless steel are to have a wall thickness of 1.5 mm, and be tested to a minimum pressure of 360 MPa.

Stainless steel would probably be the best for caravan usage, but they are likely to be quite expensive. So, when exchanging gas bottles, the number 1 in the circle should be preferred. The number 2 bottles should be the minimal treatment for caravan usage. The number 3 and the powder coated type with number 4 in the circle should be restricted to home use."

After wanting to keep our over 10 year old bottles, we found it cheaper to purchase new than get ours checked and refurbished with the risk of rejection. We purchased two at different places an although the appeared the same with a rough measurement, both were marginally different to each other and our originals. We had to glue rubber padding onto the bottles.

Motherhen



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AnswerID: 583165

Follow Up By: galacticbob - Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 06:21

Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 06:21
Hi Mum

Just out of interest, do you know if there is a different standard for marine use?

Bob
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Follow Up By: Motherhen & Rooster - Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 07:10

Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 07:10
Hi Bob, No i don't know, but can find reference to marine grade 316 stainless steel LPG (propane) gas bottle, and marine sellers quoting stainless steel, composite fibreglass and aluminium for rust free marine use.

Mh
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Reply By: Deleted User - Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 17:01

Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 17:01
I rekon you've nailed it MH.
The tester in Rocky Qld charges $24 so it is economical. In my case he replaced my failed one with one he had in storage.
So I have two bottles that fit but are not 1 or 2 rated but were fitted by BT when new????????

I have a galv one branded MILLARD off our old van from the sixtes...perfectly usable.
Have a total of five would you believe.

On the subject of refilling, any of the gas companies will do it and also Bunnings HW. Some van parks will do it.

Using Swap and Go is asking for avoidable trouble IMO.

As MH has pointed out the whole portable gas canister business appears to be written in stone of which insurance companies are very much aware.




AnswerID: 583166

Follow Up By: Pixellator - Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 21:22

Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 21:22
Hi Ern

All the Bunnings stores I've been to over the last year or two only now offer Swap'n'go. Apparently there was an 'incident' somewhere during a refill.

They will however sell you a new cylinder (presumably to have filled elsewhere!).

Another of my gripes is that you get charged for a complete refill whether or not your cylinder is empty... why can't they legislate to stop the ripoff and charge by weight? Grr!

All the best to you
Bob
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Reply By: Trackor 2 - Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 18:34

Monday, Sep 26, 2011 at 18:34
My 2001 BT was fitted with 2 x #3 gas bottles on delivery.

Peter
AnswerID: 583167

Reply By: gottabjoaken - Sunday, Oct 02, 2011 at 18:55

Sunday, Oct 02, 2011 at 18:55
The problem with the number 3 and 4 bottles is that they are much more prone to chipping the surface coating and subsequent rusting from stone chips etc.

Rusted surface will automatically cause rejection on retest, and may even be refused refilling by an alert operator.

It is very surprising (not!) that BT should fit the cheaper number 3 home barbeque bottles when most other caravan manufacturers fit number 2.

Ken
AnswerID: 583168

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