Sensatyre - Not sure which model to buy. HELP !

Submitted: Tuesday, Dec 11, 2012 at 21:08
ThreadID: 128438 Views:2175 Replies:6 FollowUps:7
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Three types of sensor are available:
•The strap on, which is the most popular, fits inside the wheel.
•The valve stem, which also fits inside the wheel replacing the valve.
•The valve cap simply replaces the existing valve dust cap.

What are the pros and cons of these three types ?

Thanks,

Willie
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Reply By: Turist - Tuesday, Dec 11, 2012 at 21:14

Tuesday, Dec 11, 2012 at 21:14
•The strap on, which is the most popular, fits inside the wheel.
Almost indestructible, not obvious to thieves.

•The valve stem, which also fits inside the wheel replacing the valve.
Looks like a normal valve, not easy to bust, this system is used on the Silverado and I don't know of any problems.
You need to remind a tyre fitter that they are fitted to avoid damage when removing tyre.

•The valve cap simply replaces the existing valve dust cap.
Subject to damage and getting pinched.

Regards
Bob
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Follow Up By: Willie - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 00:32

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 00:32
"•The valve stem, which also fits inside the wheel replacing the valve.
Looks like a normal valve, not easy to bust, this system is used on the Silverado and I don't know of any problems.
You need to remind a tyre fitter that they are fitted to avoid damage when removing tyre"

Bob,

When you say "inside the wheel" I gather you mean the tyre has to come off and then the unit is fitted on the rim inside the tyre.

Do you have to replace batteries etc on this unit inside the tyre ?

Thanks a lot,

Willie.
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Reply By: SMICK - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:27

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:27
Best one to get is the strap on type. Batteries should last about 7 years.
AROUND AUSTRALIA AT 80 KAYS.
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Follow Up By: Willie - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:45

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:45
So do yo buy a set, then just get a tyre dealer to install them - or does it require some specialist to fit them ?
Thanks,
Willie.
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Reply By: Turist - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:51

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 02:51
Strap on require tyre removal.
I think that the valve style could be fitted by breaking bead on one side only.
Batteries in Chevy style good for 5 to 7 years, same for strap on type.

Bob
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Follow Up By: Willie - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:45

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:45
Thanks for the info Bob. Willie.
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Reply By: Noosa Fox - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 04:07

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 04:07
We have the valve cap type from "Pressure Pro". They have an easy to read monitor that can be fitted anywhere in the cab.

They do not require any specialised fitting and it is simply a case of putting a lock nut on the valve stem, screw the sensor on and then tighten the locking nut.
We have had ours for 3 years now and have not had any problems with them and I know of others who have had them longer, also without problems.

They ONLY measure Pressure not heat as well like the Sensor Tyre system BUT the Pressure Pro system is half the price and there is no expense for fitting.

Sensor Tyre is also a BOG supporter but you will have to go to the newsletter to see their details as they are no longer on the right hand side of the web page.

Brian
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Follow Up By: Willie - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:44

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:44
Hi Brian,
Where did you install the Pressure Pro in-car control box ? Apparently you can put them on the sunvisor and run a 12v wire from the interior light switch area.
Thanks,
Willie.
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Follow Up By: Noosa Fox - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 23:03

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 23:03
We have an F250 so plenty of room. I just have it attached to the dash with power connected direct from a live battery wire so that it is always on and you don't have to wait for it to power up to find that pressure has dropped overnight etc.

The control head has an antenna about 75 ml high attached to the top so you have to add that in when finding a suitable spot. They do sell as an extra an extension antenna that would just have a cable attached to the top and the actual antenna could then be placed under the rear of car and that would give better reception.

We are very happy with ours.

Brian
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Reply By: Motherhen & Rooster - Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 04:44

Wednesday, Dec 12, 2012 at 04:44
Hi Willie

With our much welcomed raffle prize, we are the proud owners of the strap on type. We had to get our local tyre service to take off the tyres to fit - he had never heard of them. The setting up of the wiring and monitoring was something my husband had to work on with a lot of trial and error, calls to Hannibal Safari who donated the prize and a question raised here. In particular thanks to the photos here, we got it all working.

Motherhen
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Follow Up By: Willie - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:47

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:47
Mrs Chook,
Good to hear your still scratchin around. Have a great Christmas.
Willie.
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Reply By: Uncle Dodgy - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 20:35

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 20:35
Hi Willie
We as you no doubt already know, have a 6 wheeler Nissan Patrol as our Tug and with the BT and the spares have 14 wheels in all.
I have just finished fitting the strap type to all 14 wheels.
Some of our rims were pretty badly stone chipped and the others were marked as well, so, while the rims were seperated from their tyres, I made use of the opportunity to have the rims sand blasted and 2 pack painted before I fitted the strap ons. (Done in two batches of 8 and 6 respectively)
Fitting up of the signal recievers and cables was a breeze, the biggest difficulty was getting my bones to bend enough while I ran the cable through the fire wall of the Tug. Just needs a little forethought as to potential stone damage to the cable and recievers when chosing their locations/routes. All held in place with supplied Zip Ties. Good idea to stay well clear of the exhaust system.
I sperated the rims in to 2 batches to permit leaving the BT/Tug (as the case may be) on vehicle stands while they were being rejouvenated.
I marked the inside of each rim, next to a wheel stud hole, with a permenant ink pen with the same ID number as used for that wheel's location on the monitor to provide easy identification of the relevant sender unit of each wheel after the tyre had been reassembled.
I found Peter Spowart of Hannibal Safari Equipment, most helpful and he sent the kit with instructions and a coreolation sheet where the wheel number and ID Code of each sender unit could be identified. (This will later prove usefule when wheels are rotated/exchanged)
All I did for him was to give him a detailed verbal description of what I had and how it was configured, and he designed our system.
With a cordless drill driving a small socket to fit the worm drive strap, I had little difficulty installing the sender units to each rim on my own, following Peter's instructions. Final tightening undertaken with a large straight blade screw driver.
The owners manual was obviously printed overseas as the english requires a careful read to fully understand it initially, but then all becomes clear.
You should have little difficulty installing the system yourself (apart from removing and reinstalling the tyres and rebalancing of course) by following the instructions provided as long as you are confident to undertake your own modifications/repairs on your equipment, otherwise it might prove best to have the work undertaken by someone else. I write this not having a clue where your talents might lay.
The most important part I feel is being able to identify each sender unit in relation to each wheel after the tyre has been reassembles and rebalanced.
Our complete job, kit, sandblast & paint, remove refit and rebalance, cost less than $2000.00,(about $140.000 / wheel on avrage all included) and it won't take long to repay that with the cost of tyres saved, We have just under $5000.00 worth of tyres in our set up.
Cheers
John
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Follow Up By: Willie - Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:38

Sunday, Dec 16, 2012 at 22:38
John,
Thanks for that great answer.. It gives me the confidence to go ahead with it.
Cheers,
Willie.
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